White House Conference on Aging Launches Series of Regional Forums to Engage Public

The White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA) is launching a series of regional forums to engage with older Americans, their families, caregivers, leaders in the aging field, and others on the key issues affecting older Americans.  The closest meeting location is Boston, MA on May 28th.

th“This Administration is committed to aging issues, and the 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade,” says Assistant to the President and Director of the Domestic Policy Council, Cecilia Muñoz. “We are dedicated to promoting policies that benefit elderly – and ultimately all – Americans.”

The regional forums are being co-sponsored with AARP and co-planned with the Leadership Council of Aging Organizations (LCAO), a coalition of more than 70 of the nation’s leading organizations serving older Americans. Participation is by invitation, but the events will be webcast to various locations.  The forums are designed to help provide input and ideas for the 2015 White House Conference on Aging, which will be held in Washington, DC later this year.

The White House Conference on Aging has been held once a decade, beginning in 1961 and is designed to help chart the course of aging policy.  The 2015 Conference will focus on four areas:  ensuring retirement security; promoting healthy aging; providing long-term services and supports; and protecting older Americans from financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect.

The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade. As we listen to aging leaders and older Americans, some of the common themes we hear include the following:

  • Retirement security is a vitally important issue. Financial security in retirement provides essential peace of mind for older Americans, but requires attention during our working lives to ensure that we are well prepared for retirement.
  • Long-term services and supports remain a priority. Older Americans overwhelmingly prefer to remain independent in the community as they age. They need supports to do so, including a caregiving network and well-supported workforce.
  • Healthy aging will be all the more important as baby boomers age. As medical advances progress, the opportunities for older Americans to maintain their health and vitality should progress as well.
  • Seniors, particularly the oldest older Americans, can be vulnerable to financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect. The Elder Justice Act was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act, and we need to realize its vision of protecting seniors from scam artists and others seeking to take advantage of them.

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